You sell your house/apartment/office/factory/ plot of land. You instruct your conveyancer to pass transfer to the buyer, and start dreaming of what you will do with the proceeds.

 

But then your lawyer says: “Hang on, you didn’t give me the property’s original title deed and I need it before I can pass transfer – where is it?”

 

Panic! You can’t find it. The bank doesn’t have it (bondholder normally insist on keeping the title deeds of properties bonded to them as a security measure, at least until the loan is repaid in full and the bond cancelled). You didn’t leave it with your lawyer for safekeeping (perhaps you should have). You search high and low both at home and in the office, to no avail. Your spouse has a vague memory that you may have left it with Uncle Festus to lock away in his vault, but Uncle F dies 10 years ago and his house and all his worldly goods are long gone. Or perhaps it was stored in your holiday home and went up in smoke (literally) in that bush fire in 93? Panic!

 

Relax. There is – for a short while anyway – a quick and cost effective remedy. Have your lawyer apply for a certified copy of the Title Deed. All you need to do is attest to an affidavit, say that a “diligent search” has failed to locate the title deed, and confirm that it isn’t pledged or held as security by anyone.

 

All being well, a few weeks and a reasonable legal fee later, the Deeds Office issued a certified copy of the title deed and the transfer proceeds.

 

Act now, before it all changes

 

What has thrown the cat amongst the pigeons is a recent change to the application Regulations which will, from 25 February, require that –

  1. Your affidavit now has to be attested by a notary public. A Notary Public is a specialized attorney who “notarises” documents in a formal recording and certification process that carried more weight than would attach to a normal affidavit signed before a Commissioner of Oaths. That translates into extra cost and delay.

 

  1. Your application must now be advertised in the Government Gazette, and for 2 weeks after publication must lie open for inspection by the public at the Deeds Registry. Again, that’s more cost. And a lot more delay.

 

Owners, buyers and agents: Your urgent action plan

 

In a property transfer, time really is of the essence. The last thing any of the parties wants is delay, or extra cost. So here’s what you should do right now

 

  • If you own property, and whether or not you have thoughts of selling in the near future, this is a great time to confirm that you know where your originally title deed is. If you can’t find it, ask your lawyer for help.

 

  • If you are buying property, forward this to the seller or estate agent with a request that they confirm possession of the title deed or act to replace it immediately.

 

  • If you are an agent, do the same – forward this to everyone with a property on your books (you’re doing them a favour as well as yourself).

 

And a note for bondholders

 

The new Regulations apply equally to lost mortgage bonds, notarial bonds, registered leases, holders of real rights etc., so what is said above applies equally to you.

 

These new requirements kick in on 25 February, so your window of opportunity here is a narrow one.

 

[This article was originally published in the LawDotNews February 2019 newsletter. To view the full February 2019 newsletter please go to this link.]